Ottawa·Photos

Museum of Nature displays birds killed by crashing into windows

An organization dedicated to protecting migratory birds in urban environments displayed 300 birds during the Canadian Museum of Nature's inaugural Science by Night event. Each bird was killed in crashes with windows and buildings.

Dead bird display was part of museum's first Science by Night event

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      An organization dedicated to protecting migratory birds in urban environments displayed 300 birds during the Canadian Museum of Nature's inaugural Science by Night event — each killed in crashes with windows and buildings.

      Volunteers with the Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP) collected the birds in Ottawa during the spring and fall migration. The group recorded 570 birds that crashed into buildings in 2014, including 150 that survived.

      FLAP volunteers documented 74 bird species killed, including the barred owl, the ruby-throated hummingbirds and the Canada warbler, which is listed as a species at risk in Canada.

      The birds, which were frozen prior to being displayed during the one-night event, will be donated to museums and other institutions for research and educational purposes, FLAP said.

      The exhibit is meant to draw attention to bird-safe design guidelines for commercial and residential buildings, which includes the type of glass, lighting and landscaping used.

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