Ottawa·From the archives

City of Ottawa observes Martin Luther King Day for first time in 2005

Twelve years ago today, the City of Ottawa official observed Martin Luther King Day for the first time, paying tribute to the life and legacy of the legendary American civil rights leader.

Ceremony held at City Hall with vow to make it annual event

The City of Ottawa marked Martin Luther King Day for the first time in 2005. 0:51

Twelve years ago today, the City of Ottawa officially observed Martin Luther King Day for the first time, paying tribute to the life and legacy of the legendary American civil rights leader.

Martin Luther King Day has been a federal holiday in the United States since 1986, though it wasn't recognized by all 50 states as a paid holiday until 2000.

It is not an official holiday in Canada, though some local governments including Ottawa, Toronto and Montreal do commemorate it.

It is observed on the third Monday of every year, close to King's birthday on Jan. 15.

Still work to be done

On Jan. 26, 2005, the day was marked at Ottawa City Hall with Reverend Darryl Gray of the Union United Church in Montreal as the special guest speaker.

He spoke of the progress that had been made toward greater equality but also of the work that still needed to be done.

He had a special message for young people as well.  

Watch the CBC's report above.