Ottawa·Video

Margaret Trudeau says Canadians will get 'real change' from Justin Trudeau

Canadians expecting 'real change' from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will not be disappointed, a beaming Margaret Trudeau told an Ottawa audience shortly after her son was sworn in Wednesday as the country's 23rd prime minister.

On 'cloud ten' after Wednesday morning's swearing-in ceremony

Canadians expecting 'real change' from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will not be disappointed, a beaming Margaret Trudeau told an Ottawa audience shortly after her son was sworn in Wednesday as the country's 23rd prime minister. 1:06

Canadians expecting "real change" from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will not be disappointed, a beaming Margaret Trudeau told an Ottawa audience shortly after her son was sworn in Wednesday as the country's 23rd prime minister.

"I can't even tell you the pride that I have," she said, addressing about 200 people gathered at Lansdowne Park Wednesday afternoon. 

"But I know that Canadians across the country are looking at Justin for real change, and I just want to tell you that you are going to get it."

About 200 people gathered Wednesday afternoon at the Aberdeen Pavilion at Lansdowne Park in Ottawa to hear remarks from Margaret Trudeau, mother of newly-installed Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. (Trevor Pritchard/CBC Ottawa)
Justin Trudeau and his 30 new cabinet ministers were sworn into office Wednesday morning at Rideau Hall, where hundreds lined the walkway to the Governor General's main residence and watched the ceremony outside on large video screens.

After the swearing-in ceremony, Margaret Trudeau made her way to Lansdowne Park's Aberdeen Pavilion, where she had been scheduled to speak about her well-documented struggle with mental health issues to the city's chapter of the Canadian Association of Retired Persons.

"Of course, one of my issues that I'm bipolar," she said. "And that means that I have a wide range of emotions. So today, I think maybe I've flipped up from cloud nine to cloud ten."

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