Ottawa

LRT commission opens applications for participants in inquiry

The Ottawa Light Rail Transit Commission is looking for people and groups to apply to be involved in the public inquiry launched by the province. It made the call in a Monday press release that also unveiled the commission team and its official website.

Official website, commission co-lead counsels also announced

The province has said the inquiry will look into the technical issues that led to the two derailments of the Confederation Line last year, as well as the procurement process, the city's oversight of the project and its adherence to laws and safety standards.  (Jean Delisle/CBC)

The Ottawa Light Rail Transit Commission is looking for people and groups to be involved in the public inquiry launched by the province. 

It made the call for applications in a Monday news release that also unveiled the commission team and its official website

The site, which will be updated as the commission works its way through the inquiry process, introduces the two co-lead counsels, Christine Mainville and Kate McGrann. 

Justice William Hourigan, an Ontario appeal court judge, was named commissioner overseeing the inquiry in December. 

Mainville, who was born and raised in Ottawa, is a partner at the Toronto law firm Henein Hutchison LLP, where she has a criminal practice and conducts investigations on behalf of companies and institutions. 

She acted as senior counsel for Ontario's Independent Street Checks Review, which found carding didn't work and as co-counsel for Nova Scotia's independent review of the Rehtaeh Parsons case

McGrann specializes in corporate litigation as a partner at the Toronto law firm Crawley MacKewn Brush LLP. She was co-lead counsel for Ontario's Long-Term Care COVID-19 Commission and lead inquiry counsel for the judicial inquiry into the public-utility sell-off in Collingwood, Ont

The LRT commission's team also includes Heidi Francis as executive director, Sejal Jain as director of policy and operations and Estelle Saint-Martin as director of communications. 

Applications for inquiry participation

The province has said the inquiry will look into the technical issues that led to the two derailments of the Confederation Line last year, as well as the procurement process, the city's oversight of the project and its adherence to laws and safety standards. 

People or groups who want to participate in the inquiry have until Feb. 28 to apply through the website.

They must have a "substantial interest" in the LRT, be likely to be notified of a misconduct finding, further the conduct of the inquiry or improve its fairness, according to the commission's rules. 

Hourigan, as commissioner, will decide whether or not to grant standing to applicants and what that looks like. 

If granted standing, an applicant could be given notice of documents submitted as evidence, get to cross-examine witnesses relevant to why they were granted standing, or make closing statements.

The final report from the inquiry is expected to be given to Ontario's minister of transportation before the end of the year. 

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