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Liberal MP Deb Schulte thinks back corner is best seat in the House of Commons

It might seem like the worst seat in the House of Commons but Liberal MP Deb Schulte covets her back corner spot, furthest from the Speaker's chair.

Rookie MP for King—Vaughan discusses perks of being in the back of the backbenches

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      It might seems like the worst seat in the House of Commons, but Liberal MP Deb Schulte believes her back corner spot, furthest from the Speaker's chair, is actually the "best" one.

      "There's nobody behind me, that's a good perk. I can see everything that goes on in the House — except when everybody stands up, then I can't see a thing," she told Alan Neal on CBC Radio's All In a Day

      "I don't see myself in the backwaters at all. That just happens to be where I sit."

      Listen to the full interview in the player below.

      After examining the new House of Commons seating plan, All in a Day visits Deb Schulte, the Liberal MP with the seat in the farthest-away corner, and learns that perhaps it's not the worst seat after all. 8:18

      Schulte, a rookie MP representing King—Vaughan north of Toronto, was shuffled to the far corner of Liberal territory, in the back of the backbenches, after the naming of parliamentary secretaries caused a shift in the original seating plan.

      I don't see myself in the backwaters at all. That just happens to be where I sit.- Liberal MP Deb Schulte

      Brenda Shanahan, Liberal MP representing the Quebec riding of Châteauguay—Lacolle, was moved from the back corner spot to one right up front near the Speaker — next to the Conservative opposition benches.

      "Now, I'm in the cat's eye," Shanahan said. "Let's just say that we have a very good understanding now of the opposition frame of mind. Actually, I hear quite a bit, probably more, more than my colleagues know."

      She added that her background as a residence director makes her well-equipped to handle what she called the "frat boy" behaviour of some members of the opposition.

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