Ottawa

Safety upgrades coming to section of Laurier where cyclist died

The City of Ottawa is making changes to the section of Laurier Avenue W. where a cyclist was killed in a hit and run in May.

Interim improvements include new stop sign, signal, flexible posts

The city is making safety improvements to the section of Laurier Avenue W. where a cyclist was killed in a hit and run in May. (Giacomo Panico/CBC)

The City of Ottawa is making changes to the section of Laurier Avenue W. where a cyclist was killed in a hit and run in May.

The block between the Laurier Avenue bridge and Elgin Street, where the westbound bike lane is sandwiched between traffic lanes, will undergo numerous interim improvement to improve safety for cyclists, the city said in a news release Thursday.

The improvements will include:

  • A stop sign replacing the yield sign where the Queen Elizabeth Driveway ramp merges onto Laurier, as well as a new bike lane on the ramp itself.
  • A curb, which will close access to the far right lane on Laurier from the ramp, but allow cars into the right turn lane after the crosswalk.  
  • Flexible stakes marking the Laurier bike lane.
  • A bike signal at the crosswalk between Confederation Park and City Hall.
  • Green pavement markings to identify areas where bike and car lanes overlap.
A City of Ottawa graphic shows the proposed improvements to the area. (City of Ottawa)

Cycling advocates have criticized the current design as unsafe, because cyclists have to contend with drivers crossing the bike lane from both sides. 

The improvements are expected to be completed by the end of August, and residents should expect delays in the area until then, the city said.

The city will allocate funding for a more permanent solution in the 2020 draft budget, the release said.

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