Ottawa

Environment Canada issues heat warning for Ottawa-Gatineau

It may still officially be spring, but Environment Canada is warning people around the national capital region to prepare for decidedly summery weather over the coming days.

Temperature set to hit 31 C on Sunday and Monday

Tim Huynh cools off using the splashpad at the intersection of Preston and Somerset streets in Ottawa on June 11, 2017. (Christine Maki/CBC)

It may still be spring, but Environment Canada is warning people around the national capital region to prepare for decidedly summery weather over the coming days.

Temperatures in Ottawa-Gatineau are expected to hit 31 C on both Sunday and Monday, marking the "first heat event of the year," the weather agency said.

With the humidity, it should feel like 36 C on Sunday in Ottawa-Gatineau — although there could be some relief in the form of showers or even thunderstorms.

Overnight lows will remain around 20 C both days, according to the forecast.

Should cool down by midweek

Heat-related risks are greater for young children, pregnant women, older adults, and people who have chronic illnesses or work outdoors, Environment Canada said.

The agency is urging people to drink more water than normal and refrain from leaving pets inside hot vehicles.

The warm temperatures are expected to taper off by midweek, Environment Canada said.

Heat warnings have also been issued for other communities around eastern Ontario, including Cornwall, Hawkesbury, and Smiths Falls.

Hot weather tips

The City of Ottawa issued its own advisory Saturday, reminding people they can cool off at local pools, splash pads, community centres and Ottawa Public Library branches.

The city also offered a series of hot-weather tips:

  • Drink fluids, preferably water, and limit or avoid caffeine and alcohol.
  • Avoid strenuous outdoor activity, or otherwise be very cautious.
  • Limit direct exposure to the sun and look for shade.
  • Find shelter in air-conditioned locations.
  • Never leave children, the elderly, or pets unattended in a car — even with the windows open.
  • Stay connected with people in your community who have tough times coping with hot weather and check on them regularly.

Heat warnings are issued when the temperature exceeds 31 C during the daytime and does not get cooler than 20 C at night, or when the humidex hits 40 C for two straight days.

Humans and waterfowl alike try to stay cool near the Confederation Park fountain in Ottawa on June 10, 2017. Environment Canada has issued a heat warning for Sunday and Monday. (Trevor Pritchard/CBC)