Food truck an unwelcome arrival for Glebe restaurateur

The owner of a restaurant in the Glebe is crying foul after one of the city's new fleet of food trucks opened shop within a stone's throw of his front door.

Food truck owner says the two businesses are 'apples and oranges'

The owner of a restaurant in the Glebe is crying foul after one of the city's new fleet of food trucks opened shop within a stone's throw of his front door.

This sign is set up outside the Farmteam Cookhouse on Bank Street. (CBC)

Keith Loiselle opened the Farmteam Cookhouse on Bank Street a year and a half ago. A couple of months ago, a Red Roaster food truck began serving lunch about 50 metres down the street, selling what Loiselle says is similar fare.

"It's not like we're filling a void by having a food truck there," said Loiselle.

Loiselle has placed a sign outside of his restaurant to illustrate why he thinks the truck should move.

He said he pays about $160,000 a year in taxes, utilities, and other costs, and that the Red Roaster food truck pays the city about $6,000 for its annual permit.

Keith Loiselle, owner of the Farmteam Cookhouse says the Red Roaster food truck is taking away from his business. (CBC)

Loiselle said his lunchtime revenue has dropped significantly since the Red Roaster set up shop.

"It would be fair not to inflict harm on a business that's doing the right thing and paying its dues, by putting a truck in front of their business," said Loiselle.

Loiselle said other nearby restaurants also want to see the truck moved.

Glen Galbraith, the owner of the Red Roaster, said he understands Loiselle's frustration but says his truck and the neighbouring restaurants are like "apples and oranges."

Food truck operator doesn't see conflict

"We don't serve beer, our menus are different, so we don't really see it as a problem," said Galbraith.

Glen Galbraith, owner of Red Roaster, says there is room for his truck in the neighbourhood. CBC

Red Roaster customer Ashley Stewart said she likes the food truck.

"It's something different, and a little cheaper than the restaurants. And quick, to get back from lunch," she said.

"This city's big enough for the both of us, I don't really see what all the hubbub is about," said Galbraith.