Ottawa

5 childcare options for Quebec parents during rotating strikes

Parents in the Outaouais have had a stressful fall as they've tried to find childcare options during rotating strikes, PA Days and a recent closure due to threats made to various schools.

In-laws, daycares, entertainment centres provide help in a pinch, Ottawa Morning finds

The Quebec government's austerity measures have upset workers in the public sector that has led to weeks of rotating strikes, which have closed schools. (Elias Abboud/CBC)

Parents in the Outaouais have had a stressful fall as they've had to find childcare options during rotating strikes, PA Days and a recent closure because of threats made to schools in the region.

Since Oct. 26, teachers and support staff members have held rotating strikes two days a week as they lobby for a better contract offer from the Quebec government.

These strikes are expected to last six weeks, and have so far affected students at 26 schools in the Outaouais. 

Hallie Cotnam examined five different options for parents facing caretaking challenges last week on CBC Radio's Ottawa Morning. They might be helpful over the next few weeks of rotating strikes.

1. Take a day off, if you have that flexibility.

Some parents even support the teachers.

2. 1-800-Grandma/Grandpa.

3. Private daycares.

Pon Pon Daycare in Aylmer brought in additional workers to care for the increase in children needing daycare, which one parent took advantage of last week.

4. Family friends/neighbours/babysitters.

Lisa Crawford from Shawville, Que., said she had to hire a babysitter for this coming Monday due to the continued strike action. She also said her sister is helping out so she doesn't have to keep paying for child care.

5. Entertainment/play centres. 

Find centres like Douvris Martial Arts in Aylmer where your children can participate in camps or other activities.

You can listen to Hallie Cotnam's conversations with several Quebec parents and caretakers below.

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