Ottawa

Federal budget 2015: Ottawa police get $10M to guard the capital

Ottawa police will get $10 million over the next five years from the federal government to help cover costs for increased security measures unique to the capital.
Ottawa police will receive $2 million to cover additional policing costs in the nation's capital. (Sean Kilpatrick/Canadian Press)

Ottawa police will get $10 million over the next five years from the federal government to help cover costs for increased security measures unique to the capital.

The $2 million per year covers extraordinary costs for policing protests, VIP visits, demonstrations and security around federal institutions and landmarks.

Ottawa police had a similar deal with the federal government that expired in 2013.

The budget outlines that the "unique police environment" in which federal institutions and landmarks are under the jurisdiction of city police created the "exceptional circumstances" that requires the agreement.

But it does not include the money the Department of National Defence is paying Ottawa police to guard unarmed Canadian Forces officers standing guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. That funding is covered under a separate agreement.

The budget also calls for $60.4 million over three years on a cash basis to support increased security on Parliament Hill.

The increased security on Parliament Hill comes in response to the Oct. 22 shootings at the War Memorial and Parliament Hill in which Michael Zehaf-Bibeau fatally shot Cpl. Nathan Cirillo at the War Memorial.

Corrections

  • An earlier version of this story incorrectly said the police funding included money to guard sentries at the War Memorial. Those funds are part of a separate agreement with the Department of National Defence.
    Apr 21, 2015 6:00 PM ET

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