Ottawa

Farmer injured in tornado out of danger, family says

One of four people who remain in hospital after an EF-3 tornado carved a path of destruction through the rural west Ottawa community of Dunrobin on Friday is out of danger, his relieved family says.

Leo Muldoon, 78, was working on Dunrobin-area farm when tornado struck

Leo Muldoon with his grandson Max on the family farm near Dunrobin. (Mackenzie Muldoon)

One of four people who remain in hospital after an EF-3 tornado carved a path of destruction through the rural west Ottawa community of Dunrobin on Friday is out of danger, his relieved family says.

Leo Muldoon, 78, was trying to repair one of the barns on his farm when it collapsed on him in the storm. He suffered a collapsed lung, broken ribs and some internal bleeding.

His wife, Adele Muldoon, has been by his bedside in the intensive care unit of the Ottawa Hospital's Civic campus ever since.

She said her husband's condition has now stabilized, and she's feeling optimistic about his recovery.

"There's nothing more difficult than looking at him lying in a bed," Muldoon said Monday. "But he's strong inside and strong physically, and he has his faith."

Adele Muldoon said she's hopeful her husband will recover from his serious injuries sustained when a tornado ripped through their Dunrobin-area farm. (CBC)

Shocking destruction

Muldoon was inside their house Friday when she heard banging outside. She didn't realize a tornado had struck, but became concerned when her husband failed to return from the barn.

A family friend who came by to check on them found Muldoon in the collapsed barn. The injured farmer told ambulance attendants he'd fallen from a ladder. 

Adele Muldoon said she was shocked by the tornado's destruction.

"It was shocking to look at," Muldoon said.  "I couldn't believe what I was seeing"

What's left of the barn where Leo Muldoon was working when the tornado struck. (Meghan Muldoon)

On her own farm, established in the mid-1800's, every building but the original farmhouse was destroyed.

"It's all gone," Muldoon said.

She said she's grateful for the support the family has received, and knows many others are in a similar situation.

"I hope they get the help they need," she said. "I wish that I could help."

With files from The Canadian Press.

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