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More than sourdough: Local baking enthusiasts and bakers share favourite recipes

We’ve seen people baking a lot of sourdough lately, but there’s much more happening in kitchens across the city. CBC Ottawa recently connected with local baking enthusiasts and bakers to find out what other savoury goodies they’re creating at home.

CBC Ottawa (virtually) visited kitchens across the city for some bread-making inspiration

CBC Ottawa asked local bakers and baking enthusiasts to tell us what they’ve been baking lately — and to share their recipes. (Supplied)

Over the past few weeks, CBC has brought you stories on sourdough, starters and the trend towards baking more at home during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

We've seen people baking a lot of sourdough lately, but there's much more happening in kitchens across the city. 

We recently connected with local baking enthusiasts and bakers to find out what other savoury goodies they're creating at home.

Olivia Lam: Soft pretzels 

Besides her soft pretzels, Olivia Lam enjoys baking choux pastry and madeleines in her home kitchen. (Supplied)

Olivia Lam, 26, says she likes to make her soft pretzel recipe when she's looking for a savoury snack.   

Olivia Lam enjoys her soft pretzels when she’s craving something savoury. (Supplied)

"I love this pretzel recipe for times when I am craving something savoury. I thoroughly enjoy it because it has no eggs and therefore I can share these goods with my friends who are egg-intolerant."

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Lam says she is baking more than usual.

"But, I have to be strategic with my ingredients. There's more thought going into trying new recipes because ingredients can often be limited."

Find her soft pretzel recipe below. 

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Raymond Rizk: Flatbread

Raymond Rizk says there is nothing more satisfying than freshly baked bread. (Supplied)

Raymond Rizk, 57, of Yalla Yalla Bakery in Orleans has always enjoyed serving baked goods to the community.

Raymond Rizk's Lebanese flatbread with za'atar (Supplied)

"But since the Covid-19 outbreak, and being considered an essential service, it has made us realize how much pride we have in serving the community, and we are very appreciative of the support we have received from our customers during this time," he says.

"The foundation of this recipe is traditional Lebanese bread that I inherited from my parents. Over the years, I have perfected it with my own family in order to serve yours."

Find Rizk's Lebanese flatbread recipe below.

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Deb Abbott: Savoury biscuits 

Deb Abbott enjoys the process of baking and creating new dessert recipes to release stress. (Supplied)

The Chair of the Parkdale Food Centre Board of Directors, Deb Abbott, 63, says that baking provides time for everyone to escape and use their hands in ways that they don't normally. 

"There is something very tactile about baking – kneading dough provides an escape," she says.

Abbott says this recipe can be made up with whatever ingredients you have on hand.

"It reminds me of my family Sunday dinners growing up – if we didn't have bacon we would add in ham. In the winter months we could use the green ends of green onions. No cheddar? Not a problem, we would add in whatever cheese we had.  Buttermilk was always in our home as my grandfather loved it, so that was always available...Everyone loves the taste of a warm biscuit with butter! Bet you can't eat just one!"

Abbott’s savoury biscuits are perfect for a Sunday dinner to soak up the gravy. (Supplied)

We asked Abbott why she thinks people are baking more during this crisis.

"Everyone can be in the kitchen – young to old.  There is a place for everyone in the kitchen. There is something very tactile about baking – kneading dough provides an escape from your little spaces and the finished products are something you can be proud of.

We are all craving that personal connection in some way. Bake up some biscuits and drop them off to a friend and then share a cup of tea virtually over a biscuit, or bake up some cookies and drop them off to a friend to brighten what might be a difficult time especially someone who is in self-isolation without a family."

You can find Abbott's recipe below.

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