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Water levels still rising on St. Lawrence, Lake Ontario

Water levels on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River have exceeded those seen during the 2017 floods, and continue to rise.

Communities along eastern Ontario waterways on alert for flooding

Homes along the St. Lawrence River have been hit by recent flooding. 1:18

Water levels on Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River have exceeded those seen during the 2017 floods, and continue to rise.

On Tuesday, Lake Ontario was measured at 75.9 metres above sea level, two centimetres higher than in the spring of 2017.

The lake is expected to continue rising a few more centimetres before it begins to drop again, according to the Cataraqui Region Conservation Authority.

Last time we thought it was going to be one in 100 years, but the 100 years passed pretty quick.- Denis Doyle, mayor of Frontenac Islands

Denis Doyle, mayor of the Frontenac Islands, Ont., said the high levels have made it difficult to provide reliable ferry service to Wolfe, Simcoe and Howe islands.  

"We operate a number of ferries and we are having a hard time keeping the roads built up enough," Doyle said.

Doyle said despite the high water, damage hasn't been nearly as bad as it was along the Ottawa River.

"There are flooded basements and things like that, but the big worry is the erosion of the shoreline," Doyle said.  

"Last time we thought it was going to be one in 100 years, but the 100 years passed pretty quick."

Water levels along the St. Lawrence River are now higher than those from 2017. In this hour, two mayors on what this means for their residents. 6:59

Brockville breakwaters under pressure 

About 50 kilometres downstream, Brockville, Ont., has cut power to its marina and Blockhouse Island because of the rising waters.

"We have some experience going through this in 2017 and it's safe to say we have at least matched those levels if not exceeded them," Mayor Jason Baker said.

He's urging passing boaters to slow down to avoid putting added pressure on the breakwaters protecting the community.

"It's the recreational boaters that I think just would not understand or have any knowledge that their smaller boats are causing some damage," he said. "These high waters are speeding up the acceleration of the wear and tear on those [barriers]."

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