Canada

Ottawa offers $125M to end Caledonia dispute: report

The federal government has made a $125-million offer to settle four aboriginal land claims in an attempt to end a 15-month occupation of a housing development in southern Ontario, say reports.
The federal government has made a $125-million offer to settle four aboriginal land claims in an attempt to end a 15-month occupation of a building site in southern Ontario, say reports.
Six Nations demonstrators and police have clashed repeatedly at the Caledonia occupation site. ((CBC))

Federal negotiator Ron Doering made the offer to Six Nations officials on Wednesday night, the Toronto Star reported on Thursday.

The $125 million is to settle four land disputes:

  • The former Moulton Township in Haldimand County.
  • The flooding of lands in Dunnville to accommodate building the Welland Feeder Canal in 1829.
  • The former Burtch correctional facility in Brant County.
  • The investment of Six Nations money into the Grand River Navigation Co., in the 1830s.

The final settlement is conditional on Six Nations demonstrators moving off the site of a former housing development in Caledonia, said the newspaper.

Six Nations demonstrators have camped out at the Douglas Creek Estates since February 2006. Ontario bought the land from the developer last year for $16 million.

However, a Six Nations negotiator dismissed the offer on Wednesday night, saying aboriginals want land instead of cash, said the report.

"The only positive thing about it is it was an offer," the Star quoted Mohawk Chief Allen MacNaughton as saying.

Federal and Six Nations negotiators were expected to meet Thursday.

With files from the Canadian Press