Updated

Ontario economy NDP's 1st priority

Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath powered up her bus and kicked off her election campaign this morning with a promise to make the province's economy her first priority.
NDP Leader Andrea Horwath is splitting her time between Toronto and Hamilton Wednesday. Darren Calabrese/Canadian Press

Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath powered up her bus and kicked off her election campaign this morning with a promise to make the province's economy her first priority.

Horwath embarks on her first campaign as leader at a time of economic uncertainty, with economists warning a second recession could bring more hardships to Ontario's already fragile economy.

Horwath said Wednesday despite what some see as a mismanagement of the economy under the province's last NDP government in the 90s, her party actually has a very strong track record when it comes to finances.

Jobs and pocketbook issues have emerged as a main theme of this campaign, with all parties trying to prove only they can be trusted to get the province back on track.

Horwath first stopped in the Toronto riding of York South —Weston for a rally, followed by a rally in her hometown of Hamilton tonight.

The month-long campaign ahead of Ontario's 40th election officially got underway Wednesday morning after Liberal Leader Dalton McGuinty asked Lt.-Gov. David C. Onley to officially end the 39th legislative session and sign the election writ.

McGuinty is then attending a Liberal rally in Mississauga, a municipality outside Toronto that is expected to be a key battleground.

Progressive Conservative Leader Tim Hudak held a campaign event in the Willowdale riding in Toronto Wednesday morning before heading off to Ottawa with a stop along the way at an orchard in Colbourne. Hudak will also check in at Leeds-Grenville MPP Steve Clark’s campaign office in Brockville before heading to the Hard Rock Café on York Street in downtown Ottawa.

Going into the campaign, the Liberals held 70 of the 107 seats, the Progressive Conservatives 24, the New Democrats 10 and three seats were vacant.

Voters go to the polls on Oct. 6.

Mobile-friendly liveblog: Full election coverage

With files from CBC News