Yvonne Colbert

Consumer Watchdog

Yvonne Colbert has been a journalist for nearly 35 years, covering everything from human interest stories to the provincial legislature. These days she helps consumers navigate an increasingly complex marketplace and avoid getting ripped off. She invites story ideas at yvonne.colbert@cbc.ca

Latest from Yvonne Colbert

Training group loses funding after taking service dog back from officer with PTSD

A Nova Scotia group that trains service dogs for people with PTSD has lost its funding from a national organization amid an onslaught of online condemnation after it removed a service dog from a police officer struggling with trauma. 

Fraudsters across Canada taking in 1000s of dollars a day in shipping container scam

The scope of a scam involving the sale of shipping containers in Canada is growing, as an increasing number of legitimate companies that sell the structures say their good names are being used by fraudsters to swindle victims out of thousands of dollars.

These customers were promised shipping containers. Now they're out thousands of dollars

Scammers are duping Canadians out of tens of thousands of dollars with the promise of new shipping containers — and they're bringing down legitimate companies with them.

Consumers won't need receipts to benefit from one of Canada's largest class-action settlements

The class-action settlement — stemming from a lawsuit alleging that Microsoft and Microsoft Canada were involved in a conspiracy to illegally increase prices — amounts to about $400 million for those who purchased Microsoft PC software between 1998 and 2010.

4 things smart shoppers do to save money

There are ways to save money while shopping this Christmas season, but not everyone knows what to watch for. These tips could leave a little extra cash in your wallet.

'My jaw dropped,' says Ontario woman of $12K air ambulance bill in Nova Scotia

Most Canadians don't think they need travel health insurance while visiting other parts of the country, but if a medical emergency arises, you're not covered for some services, including ambulances.
CBC Investigates

Kitec claimants frustrated by delays in class action payout

It's been almost nine years since there was settlement in the Kitec plumbing class action lawsuit, but claimants are still waiting to learn how much, if anything, they will receive in compensation.
CBC Investigates

N.S. government acknowledges system failed to protect privacy of 10,000 people

CBC News has learned new details about a major privacy breach in documents obtained through a freedom of information request, but the province is still not disclosing how many people it's notified or how they were informed. Thousands of people's private information was posted online in error in May.

As Teddy nears, batten down the hatches and check your insurance policy

As storm Teddy approaches the Maritimes, the Insurance Bureau of Canada is advising that wind damage to homes is typically covered by insurance policies. But flooding is another question.

CRA shocks woman by asking her to pay tax on money she hasn't yet earned

A P.E.I. woman who got a letter asking for taxes on money she hadn't earned thought she was being scammed until the Canada Revenue Agency set her straight. 
CBC Investigates

Halifax photo company takes money, then leaves Dal grads out of the picture

Some Dalhousie University graduates who paid hundreds of dollars for grad photos five months ago are wondering if they’ll ever see what they paid for.

Boat at centre of $34M cocaine bust sparked COVID-19 fears when it arrived in N.S.

What started as concern about the spread of COVID-19 in a small town on Nova Scotia's South Shore from a sailboat that arrived from the Caribbean two weeks ago has turned into a major $34-million drug bust.

Doctor says stricter measures needed to protect Nova Scotians from COVID-19

A Nova Scotia family doctor is urging the province to implement stronger COVID-19 policies, including a mandatory mask policy in stores, more random testing, as well as testing essential workers who have travelled outside of the Atlantic bubble.

As N.S. focuses on calling international visitors, Florida woman awaits first call

The Nova Scotia government is struggling to check up on visitors from outside Atlantic Canada to ensure they are self-isolating for 14 days when they enter the province. A Florida woman who arrived 10 days ago says she hasn't heard from the province.

Province can't make daily self-isolation calls as it grapples with volume

A visitor to Nova Scotia from Montreal went 10 days without a checkup call from the provincial government. At that point, Mélissa Cleal made an inquiry.

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