Nova Scotia

Yarmouth musician breaks neck in trampoline accident

A well-known Nova Scotia musician who broke his neck in a freak accident said he is touched by the help he's received during his recovery.

Community rallies to support Acadian singer after freak accident

A well-known Nova Scotia musician who broke his neck in a freak accident said he is touched by the help he's received during his recovery.

Eric Surette, a popular Acadian musician in Yarmouth, was playing on a trampoline with his 11-year-old son two weeks ago. He attempted to do a flip — which he had done many times before — but landed on his head.

He broke his neck and damaged his spinal cord. Surette is now recovering from surgery in Halifax and starting physiotherapy. He is using a wheelchair and has limited movement in his hands and feet.

"I can move my fingers on my right hand, three fingers on my right hand a little bit. I haven't really started therapy yet and I can move one finger on my left hand," he said Wednesday.

"There are parts that I can't move at all yet, but they're waking up everyday. How long it will take and what I will be able to do when I'm recovered is everybody's guess. No doctor will take a poke at that."

Surette has raised thousands of dollars for charities playing country music at benefits over the years and now the community is returning the favour.

Yarmouth friends organize benefit concert

Word of his accident spread throughout the Yarmouth area and people wondered how they could help.

There are two benefit concerts planned in Yarmouth and one in West Pubnico.

His daughter Danielle Surette wheeled her father through Halifax's Public Gardens Wednesday afternoon.

"There's an irony there almost. It's strange. You wouldn't expect it to happen. I mean, nobody expects anything to happen to a family member, but it does. But it's great to see how good the community has come together," she said.

Surette said he was moved by the support. Making his living as a musician means he has little in the way of a safety net.

"It's just a really overwhelming feeling of gratefulness and gratitude for what people are doing," he said.

Surette said he has no idea when he'll be able to play guitar again. But he still plans to be a big part of the musical scene.

"I can write songs for other people. I still have my voice and my lungs and I'm a harmonica player as well. So immediately right now I could still do something."  

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