Nova Scotia

William Sandeson, facing second trial for first-degree murder, denied bail

A Nova Scotia Supreme Court judge has denied bail to William Sandeson, 28, who’s awaiting his second trial on a charge of first-degree murder.

Sandeson charged in connection with the August 2015 death of Taylor Samson

William Sandeson is awaiting his second trial on a charge of first-degree murder. (Court exhibit)

A Nova Scotia Supreme Court judge has denied bail to William Sandeson, who is awaiting his second trial on a charge of first-degree murder.

The material that formed the basis of Justice James Chipman's decision is banned from publication. His decision Friday afternoon capped two days of evidence and arguments by the Crown and defence.

Sandeson, 28, is charged in connection with the August 2015 death of Taylor Samson, whose body has never been found.

According to the Crown, the two men met at Sandeson's Halifax apartment to do a drug deal. They allege Sandeson shot Samson in the back of the head, took the drugs and disposed of the body on the Sandeson family farm near Truro.

Sandeson was convicted of first-degree murder following a jury trial in 2017. But, last year, the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal overturned that conviction and ordered a new trial.

The Crown is trying to take the case to the Supreme Court of Canada. That court has not determined if it will hear the matter. If it does, it would push back any second trial for months.

'I want to put him to rest,' Samson's mom says

Samson's mother, Linda Boutilier, was in court for the bail hearing, just as she has been for every previous court appearance.

"I really wish this could get over," Boutilier said Friday outside of court. "I just don't want to go through another five years of this again."

Sandeson's parents were in the courtroom for Chipman's decision. They left without making any comment.

"I wish his parents would make him accountable for what he did and stop being naive and realize that my son is still missing and he's out there [somewhere] and I want to put him to rest," Boutilier said.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Blair Rhodes

Reporter

Blair Rhodes has been a journalist for more than 35 years, the last 27 with CBC. His primary focus is on stories of crime and public safety. He can be reached at blair.rhodes@cbc.ca

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