Nova Scotia

Well users in southwestern N.S. still on bottled water after drought

Municipalities in southwestern Nova Scotia continue to supply drinking water to residents after a summer drought dried the wells.

'We're not completely out of the woods yet,' says EMO officer in Argyle

Some wells still have less than a metre of water in them, months after the drought. (Stephanie Blanchet/Radio-Canada)

Municipalities in southwestern Nova Scotia continue to supply drinking water to residents after a summer drought dried the wells.

The area has had some rain lately, but it still isn't enough and they will need a lot more rain to bring water levels back to normal.

Janine Muise is the Emergency Management Office co-ordinator for the Municipality of Argyle.

"There's still a few people that have only between two and four feet of water and hopefully before winter comes we get a significant amount of water that will fill those wells," she said Friday.

People in the nearby Municipality of Barrington also continue to deal with low water levels in their wells.

If the levels are still that low when winter freezes the land, the residents could be without water all winter.

"It's getting better, but we're not completely out of the woods yet," Muise said.

Warm, dry fall

CBC meteorologist Kalin Mitchell says temperatures this month are running about 2 C higher than normal. Climatological forecast models indicate temperatures will stay above normal through December, though there could still be the odd cold snap. 

"This may delay the ground from being completely frozen and give more time for rainy weather to help recharge the water table in the southwest, and more rain is needed," he said. 

But the fall has been drier than usual, too, which is why the wells haven't replenished. 

With files from Paul Palmeter