Nova Scotia

Do you have an outstanding warrant? Don't worry, surrender day is April 29

For those with an outstanding warrant looking to avoid a potential arrest at home in front of family or friends, Halifax Regional Police offer a solution.

At the moment there are 684 outstanding warrants on file with HRP

Halifax Regional Police said in a news release it has 684 outstanding warrants on file and the goal of the surrender day is to reduce that number. (Rob Short/CBC)

For those with an outstanding warrant looking to avoid a potential arrest at home in front of family or at work in front colleagues, Halifax Regional Police offer a solution.

On April 29, police will hold a voluntary surrender at the Dartmouth North Community Centre between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

Those accused of non-violent offences who voluntarily surrender will have their warrants resolved, which means police will no longer seek to arrest them. Those who surrender in will instead receive a court date.

Police warn, however, that people must attend court to answer to pending charges.

Insp. Don Moser said warrants are often issued by judges for missed court appearances or for people charged with crimes but were never found by police.

684 outstanding warrants on file

Halifax Regional Police said in a news release it has 684 outstanding warrants on file and the goal of the surrender day is to reduce that number.

Moser said the voluntary surrender is geared at those accused of offences such as theft, fraud, break and enter, or impaired driving.

Police often discover someone has an outstanding warrant by making inquiries for another reason, such as during a traffic stop. By surrendering voluntarily on April 29, suspects can avoid arrest.

There will be a booking area set up at the community centre. Participants must have a government-issued ID — preferably with a photo — and will have their fingerprints and a photo taken on site.

Police say people with outstanding warrants of any type can participate, however those with warrants for violent offences "will likely be taken into custody." 

Const. Dianne Penfound said this is the first voluntary surrender event in Canada, as far as Halifax police know, although similar initiatives have been successful in the United States. 

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