Nova Scotia

Hammonds Plains' new cenotaph erected to honour fallen soldiers

A new veterans memorial has been erected in Uplands Park. The monument stands more than 5 metres tall, and 2 metres wide, and is inscribed with the words "Lest we Forget", translated to Mi'kmaq as, ‘Mikwite'Imanej’.

New community-backed $170,000 veterans memorial goes up in Uplands Park

Todd Brayman, one of the community organizers, looks on as the $170,000 veteran's memorial gets the finishing touches (Stephanie vanKampen/CBC News)

A new veterans memorial has been erected in Uplands Park. The monument stands more than five metres tall, and two metres wide, and is inscribed with the words "Lest we Forget", translated to Mi'kmaq as, 'Mikwite'Imanej'.

The project was led by the Greater Hammonds Plains-Lucasville Cenotaph committee, and has taken more than a year of planning.

Committee chair Pamela Lovelace said the large structure will stand as a visual reminder of the price Canadian soldiers have paid over the years. 

"We've got 20,000 vehicles that travel this road daily, and so each day we will have a reminder," said committee chair Pamela Lovelace. 

"It's extremely large, but it fits really well in this park."

The group says the neighbourhood wanted a place for people to gather on Remembrance Day. 

"People weren't going to Remembrance Day ceremonies, partly because it was too difficult to get there, or there was no parking," said Lovelace. 

"So by having this structure here, and welcoming more people to a Remembrance Day ceremonies, we then find the community is more aware of why we need those monuments."

The monument includes the image of a brooding soldier as well as an inscription of the poem Flanders Fields.

"A hundred years ago, the poem Flanders Fields was written," said Todd Brayman, who was part of the organizing committee. 

"In the final verse it says, 'To you from failing hands we throw, the torch be yours to hold it high.' I think this monument is that commitment come true, where we have caught the torch and we've run with it."

The monument cost $170,000 and was paid for by the federal and provincial governments, along with a number of private donors. Organizers also fund raised nearly $20,000.

The monument will be completed by the end of May and handed over to the city during a ceremony Jul. 2, 2016. 

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