Nova Scotia

Two Halifax developments will increase traffic congestion, opponents say

A 3D model of two developments for the corner of Spring Garden Road and Robie Street in Halifax shows they could add considerably to vehicle congestion in the area.

Community activists say separate development processes have masked overall impact to neighbourhood

Development Options Halifax created 3D renderings of plans for an area near Spring Garden Road. 1:00

A 3D model of two developments for the corner of Spring Garden Road and Robie Street in Halifax shows they could add considerably to vehicle congestion in the area, according to opponents of the projects.

The model was unveiled on Wednesday.

"By using these technologies you showcase how things are going to change," said Hadrian Laing, the architecture student who created the model for a community group opposing the developments.

"When you see it in this context, people can have a discussion about what the city should look like and what they would like."

Laing points out that up to 800 cars could be using side streets to enter and exit the underground parking. "The level of congestion this is presenting to the neighbourhood is significant," said Laing.

Dexel Development wants to construct two towers, 30 and 16 storeys on one half of the block, while Peter Rouvalis wants to build two other towers, 26 and 16 storeys.

Community activists believe separate development processes have not put the combined impact in proper context.

'This is so massive'

"This is so massive, it's 80 per cent of the size of the convention centre (Nova Centre)," said Peggy Cameron of Development Options Halifax. "It's adding too much to this area."

Cameron is concerned about the impact on a historic neighbourhood adjacent to the development. Carleton Street is designated municipally, provincially and nationally as heritage streetscape for its rare early Victorian buildings.

The development proposals are expected to go to the heritage advisory committee in May before heading to public hearings at regional council.

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