Nova Scotia

Two charged in 2010 homicide of pizza delivery man

Two 21-year-old men are facing first-degree murder charges in the death of Donald Chad Smith, a pizza delivery driver who was shot to death in Dartmouth more than two years ago.

Donald Chad Smith killed outside Dartmouth apartment building

Two 21-year-old men are facing first-degree murder charges in the death of Donald Chad Smith, a pizza delivery driver who was shot to death in Dartmouth more than two years ago.

The 21-year-old men — one from Dartmouth, one from Cherry Brook — were arrested on Wednesday morning and Halifax Regional Police announced later that night that they would be charged. They are in custody and will appear in Dartmouth provincial court on Thursday.

A 26-year-old man, formerly of Dartmouth, was arrested at an undisclosed location outside the province on Wednesday, shortly before noon. He was released without charges.

Donald Chad Smith, 27, was delivering pizza to this location when he was shot. ((CBC))

Smith died of a single gunshot wound just before 9:30 p.m. on Oct. 23, 2010. He was found at a three-storey apartment building at 15 Joseph Young St. in north-end Dartmouth.

On the night the 27-year-old was shot, the call to the pizza shop on Primrose Street was placed from a pay phone on Highfield Park Drive between Joseph Young and Burnside Drive, Halifax Regional Police said at the time.

Smith was from Windsor Junction, a small suburban community in the Halifax Regional Municipality. He left behind two daughters.

Donald Chad Smith was shot to death in Dartmouth on Oct. 23, 2010. (Department of Justice)

"It was an ongoing investigation for the last two and a half years," Halifax Regional Police Const. Pierre Bourdages said Wednesday.

"It's been a very complex and long investigation. It culminated today with the arrests of these two men. I want to add as well that we're confident there are still people out there that know what happened, that have information. We're urging them to come back."

In 2011, Smith's case was added to Nova Scotia's Major Unsolved Crimes Program, which offers cash rewards of up to $150,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of people responsible for certain cases.

Bourdages said Wednesday's arrests did not come through the program.

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