Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia to recognize National Day for Truth and Reconciliation on Sept. 30

The provincial government says the day will acknowledge the legacy of Canada's residential schools and the role it plays in the reconciliation process.

Sept. 30 was designated as a federal statutory holiday earlier this summer

A red dress, symbolizing missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, and orange stones symbolizing children who died at residential schools on display at a protest in downtown Halifax on July 1, 2021. (Taryn Grant/CBC)

Nova Scotia will recognize Sept. 30 as the annual National Day for Truth and Reconciliation beginning this year.

The province said Friday in a news release the day will acknowledge the legacy of Canada's residential schools and the role it plays in the reconciliation process.

"We are taking this step to recognize the importance of honouring First Nations, Inuit and Métis residential school survivors and their families and communities," Premier Tim Houston said in the release.

Provincial government offices, public schools and regulated child care will all be closed Sept. 30. Private businesses may choose to remain open.

A federal bill to create the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation was fast-tracked through both houses of Parliament and received royal assent on June 5 of this year. 

The bill was passed after the Tk'emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation announced the remains of 215 children had been discovered on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School in British Columbia.

Nova Scotia joins B.C., P.E.I., Newfoundland and Labrador, Manitoba, Yukon and the Northwest Territories in recognizing the day. Schools will be closed in those provinces and territories. 

Nunavut will not mark the day this year, but plans to next year. 

Provinces including Alberta, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario and Saskatchewan have said they will not be recognizing the day provincially. 

MORE TOP STORIES

now