Nova Scotia·AKNUTE'N

How this Mi'kmaw educator is keeping his language and culture alive

As Halifax prepares to host the North American Indigenous Games in July, CBC's Information Morning is debuting a new column that will educate about Mi'kmaw culture.

Trevor Sanipass joins CBC Information Morning twice a month for his new column, Aknute'n

Trevor Sanipass is a Mi'kmaw educator from Eskasoni and an arm wrestling champion and coach. (Emma Smith/CBC)

As Halifax prepares to host the North American Indigenous Games in July, CBC's Information Morning is debuting a new column that will educate about Mi'kmaw culture.

Trevor Sanipass will be the show's guide in his new column, Aknute'n, which translates to "tell us a story."

The educator from Eskasoni in Unama'ki (Cape Breton) is the great-great grandson of John Denny, Jr., the last hereditary grand chief of the Mi'kmaq Grand Council.

"Family is important," said Sanipass. "Where are you from? Who's your mom? Who's your dad, your grandmother? We try to find that connection."

Mi'kmaq word of the week: Aknute'n

2 years ago
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Trevor Sanipass shares the meaning behind the word Aknute'n in the first installment of his column with CBC's Information Morning. 0:57

Sanipass works as the Department of Justice's Indigenous liaison officer. He also spends a lot of time travelling across the province sharing the culture and teachings of the Mi'kmaq.

"It's really important in our culture to share our stories, our histories that were passed down from our ancestors," he said.

Listen to Trevor Sanipass's full interview with Information Morning below.

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With files from CBC's Information Morning

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