Feature

These winter beauty shots will make you forget the cold

Once the excitement accompanying the winter holidays has passed, the remaining months — the coldest ones — can feel like something to endure. So we asked local adventurers, photographers, and some of our CBC Nova Scotia team to brave the cold in search of beauty.

Once the excitement accompanying the winter holidays has passed, the remaining months — the coldest ones — can feel like something to endure. 

So we asked local adventurers, photographers, and some of our CBC Nova Scotia team to brave the cold in search of beauty. 

Starry night

The cold can chase away the crowds, giving you complete privacy in nature. Nick Osbourne got to experience Medford Beach and its landscape of stars without interruption on a -14 C evening.

(Nick Osbourne)

Broken reflection

Blue Rocks is aglow with primal colours in every season. In these colder months, the water reflects and fragments the cerulean blue of the sky.

(Nicole Boutilier)

Ice on glass

It might be messy outside, but when seen from the warm side of the glass, you can appreciate nature's artistry as it creates a new canvas.

(Donna Parker)

Winter dawn

An icy sunrise turns the snowy landscape a frosty blue as the first fingers of morning light climb over the horizon in Pictou County.

(Angela Larkin)

Halls Harbour

You almost get the feeling of sliding into the sea on this snowy road in Halls Harbour. The ocean churned fiercely beneath the seaside homes on this clear and cold January day.

(Jessica Van Luxembourg)

Moon's mirror

There's an eerie beauty to this winter photograph, in which Adam Cornick had a friend lie down on top of two small lights and a frozen lake near Purcells Cove. If you didn't know his technique, it might seem as though the moon's sister were shining back from beneath the water.

(Adam Cornick/Acorn Art Photography)

The dying light

The evening sun casts shadows over mounds of snow as it gives off a last burst of light before dipping behind the Cape Breton Highlands.

(Tom Ayers/CBC)

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