Nova Scotia

Tanya Brooks to be remembered in Halifax 6 years after murder

Halifax Regional Police continue to investigate the murder of Tanya Brooks almost six years after her death, as the community plans a march to mark the anniversary.

Brooks's body was discovered on May 11, 2009, in a trench along St. Patrick's-Alexandra School

Tanya Brooks was a mother of five, and an aboriginal woman associated with the Millbrook First Nation. (Contributed)

Halifax Regional Police continue to investigate the murder of Tanya Brooks almost six years after her death, as the community plans a march to mark the anniversary.

On May 11, 2009, Brooks's body was discovered at 2:17 p.m. in a trench along St. Patrick's-Alexandra School on Maitland Street in Halifax.

She was an aboriginal woman associated with the Millbrook First Nation and the mother of five children.

Community members are marking the anniversary of Brooks's death with a march to stop violence against aboriginal women. The walk begins at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday at the Mi'kmaq Native Friendship Centre on Gottingen Street and proceed to police headquarters for a short ceremony.

Halifax Regional Police say investigators were able to trace Brooks's last movements until about 9 p.m. the night before her body was found.

Police say they believe Brooks knew her killer, or killers, and there are people out there who knew what happened to the 35-year-old woman.

Police are encouraging those people who may know something to report it to them at (902) 490-5016 or through Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

The case was added to the province's list of major unsolved crimes in July 2009.

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