Nova Scotia·Video

Halifax mental health walk-in clinic may get more cash to keep running

Funding from the provincial government may be on the way for a Halifax mental health walk-in clinic program at risk of permanent closure after it was unable to secure funding to move it past the pilot project stage.

Pause: Mental Health Walk-in Pilot Project is at risk of permanent closure over lack of funding

The Pause: Mental Health Walk-in Pilot Project aims to help people with mental-health issues who are marginalized, homeless or with addictions, or those who can't wait for help for lengthy periods of time. (Dave Laughlin/CBC)

Funding from the provincial government may be on the way for a Halifax mental health walk-in clinic program at risk of permanent closure after it was unable to secure funding to move it past the pilot project stage.

Communities, Culture and Heritage Minister Leo Glavine said his department will contact the North End Community Health Centre to see what it can do it help keep the Pause: Mental Health Walk-in Pilot Project going.

"We feel that it is such an important service to the community," Glavine told reporters.

The pilot project aims to help people with mental-health issues who are marginalized, homeless or with addictions, or those who can't wait for help for lengthy periods of time.

Marie-France LeBlanc, executive director of the North End Community Health Centre, said someone from the province contacted her Thursday afternoon.

"We're thrilled that they will be talking to us. This was a great pilot project that was funded by them and I think what we've done is we've clearly shown and established that it is a real need in the community," LeBlanc said.

The pilot, which began late last spring, received a $27,350 grant from Communities, Culture and Heritage.

Leo Glavine on Halifax mental health walk-in clinic

2 years ago
Duration 2:50
Nova Scotia's Communities Culture and Heritage minister says his department will be reaching out to the North End Community Health Centre to discuss options. 2:50

It had been offering the drop-in programs Tuesday night at the North End Health Centre on Gottingen Street and Thursday night at the Chebucto Family Centre on Herring Cove Road.

The program is currently in its last week of operation, unless it can get more funding.

LeBlanc estimates the program would need around $50,000 a year to keep running.

"We're really happy that the community rose to the occasion and put a spotlight on it and the minister is willing to take a look at how we can fund that moving forward," she said.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Anjuli Patil

Reporter

Anjuli Patil is a reporter and occasional video journalist with CBC Nova Scotia's digital team.

With files from Michael Gorman and Jean Laroche

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