Nova Scotia

Stewiacke volunteers offer to deliver groceries, medications to those self-isolating

In Stewiacke, N.S., about two dozen volunteers from the fire department and the town will work with the local grocery store and pharmacy to guarantee people have their necessities.

'We'll just drop them off on the doorstep or in the yard somewhere,' says town CAO

The volunteer fire department in Stewiacke, N.S., will help deliver medication and groceries to people who are self-isolating. (Dale Bogle)

The town of Stewiacke, N.S., has organized a free delivery service of essential items to those who self-isolate due to COVID-19, part of an effort by local officials to prepare for the arrival of the virus.

"If someone's down to three days left on a particular medication, and if they need it — we can get it, we can deliver it and make it work," said Dale Bogle, the chief administrative officer of Stewiacke.

"We don't need to have any physical contact and so I think that's really reassuring." 

Nova Scotia has 12 cases of COVID-19, three confirmed and nine presumptive, as of Wednesday afternoon. 

The provincial government has asked citizens to reduce contact with others, practise good hygiene and recommends being prepared to be in your home for 72 hours.

Bogle said there haven't been any reports of the virus in the town of 1,450 people, but the service is ready to go for when residents start self-isolating or quarantining.

About 24 volunteers from the fire department and the town will work with the local grocery store and pharmacy to guarantee that people have their necessities. 

"We'll just drop them off on the doorstep or in the yard somewhere just so we avoid contact," he said. 

"That seems to be a pretty unique way to go about it so we can ensure that people stay home and that the worry of running out of medication, is that we will be able to handle that."

Mayor Wendy Robinson said some residents have been travelling so she expects some people to start self-isolating. She said she's proud of the fire department for volunteering their time to help.

"I'm overwhelmed with the generosity of people who are willing to put themselves at risk," Robinson said.

The service hasn't been implemented yet, but Bogle said they want to be proactive. 

"The biggest thing is, is ensuring that the people that need to be isolated, remain isolated and they don't have to go out and create a risk for things that we can actually provide as a service through the community," he said.

About the Author

Cassidy Chisholm is a web writer from New Brunswick who is now sharing stories at CBC Nova Scotia. She can be reached at cassidy.chisholm@cbc.ca.

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