Nova Scotia

St. Patrick's Halifax plans receive just 170 online votes

It's a prime piece of property in Halifax, but only a small number of people have weighed in on what the old St. Patrick's High School should look like in the future.

Do you want a square, a grid or a plaza?

It's a prime piece of property in Halifax, but only a small number of people have weighed in on what the old St. Patrick's High School should look like in the future.

For the first time, the city is allowing people to vote on the design direction for the Quinpool 6067 development.

But as of Tuesday morning, just 170 surveys have been completed.

City staff will also use the feedback from the 150 people who attended the open house on July 22.

The three-and-a-half acre property is worth about $7 million.

There are three possible futures for the new development: a grid, square or plaza.

Each have different goals. The square is largely to allow for buildings that are lower; the grid creates a variety of open spaces; the plaza has one large open space and buildings of various heights.

The city is hoping more people complete the online survey by Friday to vote on which direction they'd prefer for the area.

The consulting team will announce the final concept at an open house in September.

Demolition on the property has already begun and fencing has been installed around the building.

The sale of the property is expected to happen sometime next year.

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