Nova Scotia

Environment Canada says it is making stride in species at risk plans

Environment Canada says it is tackling the backlog in proposed species at risk strategies and is whittling down the number of management plans that need to be formulated.

Department says last fiscal year it posted recovery strategies and management plans for 61 of 192 species

Bats are one of the species scientists have been urging the government to protect after a fungal infection known as white-nose syndrome wiped out most of the population in parts of eastern North America. (Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation/AP)

Environment Canada says it is tackling the backlog in proposed species at risk strategies and is whittling down the number of such plans that need to be formulated.

In 2013, the federal auditor general admonished Environment Canada for its backlog of about 150 cases. According to documents obtained by CBC through access-to-information laws, as of June 2014, the number had grown to 174.

However, Environment Canada says it has made strides since then. 

In an email, a department spokesperson said in 2014 it started a three-year plan to address the overdue proposed recovery strategies and management plans for a total of 192 species. 

According to the department, during the first year of that plan it posted recovery strategies and management plans for 61 of those 192 species. 

Now in its second year, the plan is supposed to set up strategies and plans for 71 species. As of Nov. 3, only nine of those species have been taken care of. 

The next list of animals, fish, plants and insects at risk will be made at the end of this month.

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