Nova Scotia

Savage Arms guns at Canadian Tire 'shocked' Clayton Park shoppers

A Nova Scotia woman wants Canadian Tire to get rid of a brand of firearms she says are offensive to Aboriginal Peoples.

U.S. company says guns named for founder Arthur Savage; logo was a gift from a Chief Lame Deer

Savage Arms is a company based in the U.S. The founder's name was Arthur Savage. (Myah Rach-Sharp)

A Nova Scotia woman wants Canadian Tire to get rid of a brand of firearms she says are offensive to Aboriginal Peoples.

Myah Rach-Sharp was at the Clayton Park Canadian Tire store last week when she saw Savage Arms guns for sale.

"When I looked closer I saw that there was a picture on top with an Aboriginal man in a headdress," she said. "It just shocked me that in today's day and age that that would be acceptable."

Savage Arms is a company based in the U.S. The founder's name was Arthur Savage.

The Savage Arms logo.

On the history section of its website, it says the logo was given to the founder by a Chief Lame Deer in 1919. The website says the two made a deal that the tribe would receive discounted rifles and Savage would get their support.

"Arthur Savage added the Indian-head logo — a direct gift from the chief — to the company name," it says. 

It doesn't give the chief's tribal affiliation, or any other biographical information. 

Rach-Sharp said the backstory doesn't make a difference. 

"It's racist in the way that it puts the two together," she said. "I think they should discontinue selling those guns."

She isn't the only person who finds the logo offensive.

Glen Reykdal thinks the company should change the logo.

"The image that was portrayed, the Indian chief with the headdress on that went along with it, yeah, I would find that offensive," he said.

A spokesperson for Canadian Tire referred CBC News to the Savage Arms website.

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