Nova Scotia

N.S. now paying for infants to be immunized against common virus

Parents of infants born after Nov. 1, 2019, in Nova Scotia no longer have to pay to immunize their kids against rotavirus, a highly infectious and common gastrointestinal illness that affects children up to two years old.

Oral vaccine taken in baby's first 2-6 months

The rotavirus vaccine is administered orally at the ages of two, four and six months. (CBC)

Parents of infants born after Nov. 1, 2019, in Nova Scotia no longer have to pay to immunize their kids against rotavirus, a highly infectious and common gastrointestinal illness that affects children up to two years old. 

The symptoms of the virus include vomiting, diarrhea and fever.

The oral vaccine will be administered along with regularly scheduled vaccines, including those that protect against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio and influenza.

Parents will be able to take their babies to a primary care provider, such as a physician or nurse, to get their routine immunizations at two, four and six months. It's also available at public health offices. 

The province started funding the vaccine Jan. 1, becoming the last province to cover it. It's expected to cost $200,000 annually.

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