Nova Scotia

Rocky Jones, civil rights activist, honoured

One of Nova Scotia's best-known civil rights activists is being recognized Tuesday by the province's human rights commission.

Provincial human rights commission honours Nova Scotia social activist

Rocky Jones was in the public eye for more than four decades as a social activist on matters of human rights, race and poverty.

One of Nova Scotia's best-known civil rights activists is being recognized Tuesday by the province's human rights commission.

Rocky Jones died in July at the age of 71.  

On Tuesday, he will be honoured posthumously with a human rights award during a ceremony at the International Human Rights Day Event at the Prospect Road Community Centre in Hatchet Lake.

Five others will also receive awards.

Jones was a high-profile Halifax lawyer and champion of Nova Scotia's black community.

He was in the public eye for more than four decades as a social activist on matters of human rights, race and poverty.

In his student days in the 1960s and '70s, Jones was viewed a radical, and monitored by Canadian police and by members of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

He had connections with the Black Panther Party, and was a founding member of the Black United Front in Nova Scotia. He played a leading role in creating an indigenous program for black and Mi'kmaq people at the Dalhousie Law School.

He and Joan Jones, his wife at the time, founded an inner city help program for people who were struggling with poverty.

In the early 1990s, he graduated from law school, and worked for legal aid until he founded his own law firm. It focused largely on human rights, criminal and prisoners' rights, and labour law .

Jones received many awards including the Order of Nova Scotia and an honorary doctorate of law from the University of Guelph.

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