Nova Scotia

Residents wake up to another day of sewage smells

Residents in Halifax's south end are bracing for another day of unpleasant smells after three disabled pumping stations spilled raw sewage into the Halifax harbour.

Disabled pumping stations spilled sewage into harbour

The problematic Pier A pumping station near the corner of Barrington and Inglis streets (CBC)

 

Residents in Halifax's south end are bracing for another day of unpleasant smells after three disabled pumping stations spilled raw sewage into the Halifax harbour.

The problematic Pier A pumping station near the corner of Barrington and Inglis streets broke down, and subsidiary pumping stations in Point Pleasant Park and the Atlantic School of Theology are offline.

Vacuums cleaning the station are creating the unpleasant odors.

Allan MacPherson, head chef at Boneheads BBQ, said another day of the wafting, putrid odour is bad for business.

"We are a smokehouse, a large part of what we do comes from the really wonderful smells and the meat cooking and that just gets kicked in the shins and knocked off the tables when you're down wind from sewage. There's no way around it," he said.

Meanwhile, Black Rock beach at Point Pleasant Park and the Dingle beach have been closed since Sunday as a result of the sewage  problem.

Halifax Water said it hopes repairs will be complete by the end of the week.

Halifax pumped raw sewage into the harbour for decades before opening a $55 million treatment plant in 2008, followed by the opening of harbour beaches to much fanfare.

The plant flooded and stopped working in 2009 and the beaches were closed again until the plant got back online in June 2010. This latest shutdown only affects pumping stations, not the main treatment plant.

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