Nova Scotia

Halifax resident worried about traffic impact of Bayers Road project

A west-end Halifax resident is worried traffic restrictions that are part of a plan to build bus lanes on Bayers Road will make it harder for emergency vehicles to access his street.

'It's not going to alleviate anything,' says Norm Seguin. 'It's just going to make things worse'

A rendering of the Bayers Road project, with two lanes being used for buses only. (Halifax Regional Municipality)

A west-end Halifax resident is worried traffic restrictions that are part of a plan to build bus lanes on Bayers Road will make it harder for emergency vehicles to access his street.

The project will also include a multi-use path for pedestrians and cyclists, and right turns will no longer be permitted from Bayers Road onto George Dauphinee Avenue or Micmac Street.

Norm Seguin lives on Micmac Street. He believes the traffic restrictions will also reduce access to his street for people who live in the area and won't reduce the number of vehicles that use his neighbourhood as a shortcut when traffic is backed up on Bayers Road.

"It's not going to alleviate anything," he said. "It's just going to make things worse and it's going to take me an additional 30 minutes to get to my house."

Seguin would like to see more consultation with local residents, as well as the commuters who use Bayers Road.

Open house on Wednesday

The first phase of the work involves a section of Bayers Road between Romans Avenue and Windsor Street.

According to the city's traffic counts, more than 40,000 vehicles use Bayers Road daily.

"Bayers Road is a major artery in and out of the city and I think it should be treated as such," said Seguin.

There will be an open house to review and discuss the design of the project on Wednesday evening from 6 to 8 at the Halifax Forum.

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