Nova Scotia

Tender for redevelopment of Cogswell District pushed back to 2021

Work on replacing the Cogswell Interchange with a mixed used neighbourhood is behind schedule partly because of the pandemic but mainly because land negotiations have taken longer than expected.

Work has been delayed by pandemic and land negotiations

Redevelopments will include more green space in the Cogswell District. (Halifax Regional Municiaplity)

The tender for the redevelopment of the Cogswell District in downtown Halifax is now expected to be issued in early 2021.

The project, one of the biggest development projects ever planned for Halifax, would see a new neighbourhood being created. The sprawling project will connect the city's north end, waterfront and the downtown core.

Work on replacing the Cogswell Interchange with a mixed-use neighbourhood is behind schedule partly because of the pandemic but mainly because land negotiations have taken longer than expected.

In order to build a roundabout near Cornwallis Street, a parcel of land had to be purchased from the Department of National Defence.

"It does require some land to create the new leg that will go into the DND," said John Spinelli, the project manager. "Those negotiations are now complete and signed off."

The area will also feature a new roundabout near Cornwallis Street. (Halifax Regional Municipality)

The project also needs to buy a triangle of land owned by Crombie REIT in order to create a park and transit hub near Granville Street.

"That will be Ordinance Park, which is key, it's a pretty important piece," said Spinelli. "It's close, but I don't think it's going to hold up the project going to tender."

The redevelopment will require a triange of land currently owned by Crombie REIT to create a park and transit hub near Granville Street. (Halifax Regional Municipality)

Even if a construction company is hired by next spring, Spinelli thinks it will be the fall of 2021 before any work gets underway. He said it will be done in phases so commuters and port traffic will be able to get through the area.

"One of the first things we will do is create a four-lane bypass road," said Spinelli. "It'll get shifted around a bit, but there will be two lanes north and two lanes south."

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Pam Berman

Reporter

Pam Berman is CBC Nova Scotia's municipal affairs reporter. She's been a journalist for almost 35 years and has covered Halifax regional council since 1997. That includes four municipal elections, 19 budgets and countless meetings. Story ideas can be sent to pam.berman@cbc.ca

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