Nova Scotia

2 Cape Breton communities without water due to Dorian power outages

Two Cape Breton communities are without water in the aftermath of Dorian. Power outages in Mabou and Whycocomagh have knocked out the plants that supply and treat domestic water.

Power outages knock out water treatment plants in Mabou, Whycocomagh

People in Mabou and Whycocomagh are without water, as community treatment plants cannot supply any during prolonged power outages. (Robert Short/CBC)

Two Cape Breton communities are without water in the aftermath of Dorian, the powerful weekend storm that led to hundreds of thousands of electricity outages in the Atlantic region.

Power outages in Mabou and Whycocomagh have knocked out the plants that supply and treat domestic water.

"If they turn on their taps, they will have very little water,' said Keith MacDonald, the chief administrative officer for the Municipality of the County of Inverness.

"If there is any, it would be safe, because it would have been stored in our reservoir. But the reservoir is in a depleted state."

The municipality is advising residents to go to comfort centres at the Mabou Fire Hall and Whycocomagh Fire Hall for free bottled water they can take home, along with coffee and tea.

Inverness County CAO Keith MacDonald said the county is working with Nova Scotia EMO to prioritize the restoration of power to the water treatment plants in Mabou and Whycocomagh. (Tom Ayers/CBC)

There are about 330 homes, businesses and other buildings in Whycocomagh connected to the municipal water supply, and about 160 in Mabou.

MacDonald said the municipality is working with provincial emergency officials to try to "prioritize" power restoration for the two plants.

But MacDonald said he had no indication when power might be restored. Once it is, he said it will be another six to 12 hours before the reservoirs can supply water again.

The municipality is also asking people in Port Hood, Inverness, Port Hasting and Judique to conserve water, as the water supplies in those communities are low.

A note to residents on social media asks people to avoid flushing toilets, washing clothes and dishes, or taking showers or baths.

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