Nova Scotia

HRM warns of blue-green algae risk at Sandy Lake in Bedford

The Halifax Regional Municipality is advising residents to avoid swimming at Sandy Lake in Bedford, N.S., until further notice. People who ingest it could experience rashes, sore throat, sore red eyes, fever and vomiting. Blue-green algae bloom has been linked to dog deaths in New Brunswick.

City recommends residents not swim in lake until further notice

People who come into contact with blue-green algae may experience skin irritation, rash, sore throat, sore red eyes, swollen lips, fever, nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea, HRM said in a news release. Children and immune-compromised individuals are at a higher risk. (Submitted by Nova Scotia Environment)

Update, Aug. 8, 2019: The municipality has lifted its algae advisory and has reopened Sandy Lake Beach to swimming. "Following initial water testing, the municipality has confirmed there are no toxin-producing strains of cyanobacteria present in the water," the city said in a news release Thursday. 

The Halifax Regional Municipality is recommending people not swim in Sandy Lake or allow pets to go in the lake until further notice because of a possible blue-green algae bloom.

The Bedford lake is a supervised beach, but is now closed to swimming.

According to a news release sent out by the municipality, some types of blue-green algae can produce toxins during blooms and when the blooms begin to decay, toxins could be released into the water that could be harmful to people and pets.

People who come into contact with blue-green algae or swallow the water may experience skin irritation, rash, sore throat, sore red eyes, swollen lips, fever, nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea.

Children and immune-compromised people are at a higher risk, the municipality noted.

It advises anyone with symptoms to seek medical help.

Bacteria is harmful to humans, lethal to pets

Blue-green algae bloom has been linked to dog deaths in New Brunswick.

Lake users are encouraged to take the following precautions:

  • Avoid water contact. If contact occurs, wash with tap water as soon as possible.
  • Do not swim or wade (or allow pets to swim or wade) in any areas where blue-green algae is visible or in areas where a risk advisory has been issued.
  • Avoid consuming water or fish from Sandy Lake.

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