Nova Scotia

Police chief died of natural causes

An autopsy has confirmed that the sudden death of Myles Burke, chief of the Cape Breton Regional police force, was due to natural causes.
Myles Burke had been a police officer for 30 years. (Cape Breton Regional Police Services)

An autopsy has confirmed that the sudden death of Myles Burke, chief of the Cape Breton Regional Police Services, was due to natural causes.

Halifax police released the results of the post mortem Sunday, but didn't give the specific cause.

Burke's body was found in a car in the parking lot of a Halifax hotel on Saturday. He had been in town for meetings with other Nova Scotia police forces.

"He was found by two of his own officers who were staying in the same hotel," said Halifax police spokeswoman Theresa Rath. "They thought he was asleep, but he was deceased when they opened the car door."

His death at 49 is being described by his peers as a major loss to policing in the province.

Chief Frank Beazley of the Halifax force said he had been meeting with his colleague just two days before and Burke's death came as a complete shock.

Burke had been in charge of the Cape Breton police force for two years.

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