Nova Scotia

Phillip Boudreau trial hears description of damage to victim's boat

The boat belonging to a missing Cape Breton fisherman suffered extreme damage the day Phillip Boudreau was last seen, a Nova Scotia Supreme Court is told.

James Joseph Landry, 67, faces 2nd-degree murder charge in case of missing man

Philip Boudreau disappeared in June 2013 and is presumed dead. Four people have been charged. (Facebook)

The boat belonging to a missing Cape Breton man suffered extreme damage the day Phillip Boudreau was last seen, a Nova Scotia Supreme Court heard on Friday.

James Joseph Landry, 67, has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder in the death of 43-year-old Boudreau on June 1, 2013.

Boudreau's overturned boat, a skiff, was found in Petit-de-Grat harbour, about 50 km east of Port Hawkesbury, but his body has never been recovered.

Federal fisheries officer Norman Fougere took the stand on Friday to describe the damage to the boat.

The Crown witness says the boat was almost broken in two.

Landry is among four people charged in the case. All are connected to the Twin Maggies, a lobster boat from the area.

Fougere says the the bow of the Twin Maggies was damaged with black and white marks and a “gouge.”

The Crown also called RCMP Const. Jim Wilson to testify. He said the overturned boat’s hull was badly beaten.

Wilson said later that day he went to Arichat where the Twin Maggies was tied up. He told the court it appeared someone tried to wash marks off the boat.

The defence asked whether damage to Boudreau's boat could have been made worse by being towed upside down. Wilson said he didn't know.

Prosecutors are calling the case “murder for lobster."

On Thursday, the Crown told court that the crew shot at Boudreau four times, ran over his boat several times, and then tied his body to an anchor, which was dropped overboard.

The Crown has not elaborated yet on how the killing may have been tied to lobster.

The case resumes on Monday.

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