Nova Scotia·FORECAST

Peter Coade's weather synopsis for March 20, 2015

Spring begins at 7:45 p.m. this evening, however, the first weekend of spring won’t be as pleasant as you would hope.

Not clear exactly what Saturday's disturbance will bring to the Maritimes

There is the potential for some 10 to 15 possibly 20 centimetres of snow — and assuming the change to rain takes place — possibly some 15 to 25 millimetres of rain in those communities of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. (Stephen Piddicombe/CBC)

A ridge of high pressure crossing the region today will bring this past winter season to an end with sunshine but with temperatures still a bit colder than the normal for this time of the year.

Spring begins at 7:45 p.m. However, the first weekend of spring won’t be as pleasant.

A trough of low pressure swinging in from the west will join up with a mild and wet disturbance approaching from the southwest.

The northern disturbance will move across New Brunswick overnight tomorrow night with snow, while the southern disturbance will likely produce some snow for Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. But then the centre is expected to pass close enough to the region with its milder temperatures to have the snow change over to rain later in the evening tomorrow.

There is the potential for some 10 to 15 possibly 20 centimetres of snow — and assuming the change to rain takes place — possibly some 15 to 25 millimetres of rain in those communities of Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

This feature will clear the area on Sunday with colder and windy weather but mostly fair weather returning.

There were earlier signs of another nor’easter approaching for Tuesday, but latest guidance suggests that although one will develop, it will stay far enough to our south so as not to affect the Maritimes at all.

With the exception of slightly milder temperatures with the disturbance moving in Saturday, it looks like afternoon temperatures will be staying a bit colder than the normal right into the middle of next week at least — although I do not see any bitterly cold temperatures in the immediate future.

About the Author

Peter Coade

Meteorologist

Peter Coade is the most experienced meteorologist in the Maritimes and has spent more than five decades as a weather forecaster. He provides Maritimers with up-to-the-minute weather forecasts every day.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.