Nova Scotia

Peggys Cove safety sign upgrades likely, Mark Furey says

Visitors to one of Nova Scotia's most visited tourist sites may soon see bigger, clearer signs warning them of the dangers of getting too close to the ocean.

Nova Scotia's tourism minister visiting site after two accidents in recent months

Police, paramedics and firefighters were called to Peggys Cove in April after Jamie Quattrocchi was swept from the rocks. (Preston Mulligan/CBC)

Visitors to one of Nova Scotia's most visited tourist sites may soon see bigger, clearer signs warning them of the dangers of getting too close to the ocean.

In recent months, two tourists have been swept by waves from the rocks at Peggys Cove, one of them last week. He was rescued, but another man, Jamie Quattrocchi, wasn't so lucky. He was washed away in April and his body has not been found.

Tourism Minister Mark Furey said a meeting Wednesday identified improved signage as one of the things that could be done in the short term to improve security at the tourist attraction.

"There's some work to be done over the course of the next two weeks; site visit to Peggys Cove itself, specific to signage to better communicate the dangers associated with Peggys Cove," he said.

What's there now there doesn't appear to be adequate to the minister.

"Some signage has disappeared," he said. "Some of them are placed on rocks quite low. In some cases signs are obstructed."

He thinks a "more strategic placement" of signs would help.

The minister said there's also been talk of adding low-level fences in certain areas. 

"Under no circumstances would we ever consider the placing of a fence out on the rock portion of Peggys Cove," he said.

"My experience is people go over and around those barriers.The discussion around a fence was specific to the perimeter of the parking lot where you could funnel or direct visitors through two or three or four entry points to the rock portion of Peggys Cove."

Furey wants more discussion before any new fences are installed.

Federal and provincial officials involved in the discussions will be back at the table in two weeks.

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