Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia's 1st convicted human trafficker gets 7-year prison sentence

The first person convicted of human trafficking in Nova Scotia under federal legislation introduced more than a decade ago has been sentenced by a judge to seven years in prison.

Owen Gibson-Skeir's victim was a 14-year-old girl

Owen Gibson-Skeir, 21, was sentenced Friday on charges of human trafficking and sexual assault. (Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press)

The first person convicted of human trafficking in Nova Scotia under federal legislation introduced more than a decade ago has been sentenced by a judge to seven years in prison.

Owen Ross Gibson-Skeir, 21, of East Preston, was sentenced Friday in Halifax provincial court. 

He pleaded guilty in December to trafficking in a person under the age of 18, receiving material benefit from trafficking, and sexual assault. The victim was 14 years old when Gibson-Skeir pimped her out at Halifax-area hotels between January and March 2016.

He posted ads online, and made his victim call him "Daddy."

Following the December court hearing, Gibson-Skeir threatened his victim with a gun gesture as he was led out of the courtroom. Two more charges were added to his file: uttering threats and intimidation of a justice participant. He is due back in court April 20, and could face additional penalties if found guilty of those charges.  

Skeir received an 18-month credit for time already spent in custody since his arrest, which means he has 5½ years left to serve.

Gibson-Skeir is prohibited from owning firearms for life and must supply a DNA sample to be kept on record.

With files from Angela MacIvor

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