Nova Scotia

Organ donor rule change may presume consent in Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia is considering changing organ donation rules so people are presumed organ and tissue donors unless they choose to opt out of the donor list.

Health Minister Leo Glavine says Nova Scotia may be ready for a reverse onus legislation

Nova Scotia is considering changing organ donation rules so people are presumed organ and tissue donors unless they choose to opt out of the donor list.

Right now, only people who have consented before they die are considered eligible donors.

Doctors and nurses may ask grieving families for permission to harvest a loved one's organs but that does not happen often.

Health Minister Leo Glavine thinks Nova Scotians may be ready for a system of "presumed consent."

"I think Nova Scotians are very thoughtful about this and I believe there's a good indication that Nova Scotians may in fact be prepared to go in this direction," he said.

Glavine said he wants to hear from Nova Scotians on the issue and will soon launch a formal consultation, although the idea is still in the planning stages and there are no definite timelines.

April is organ donation month.

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