Nova Scotia

On-street parking fee increases approved for Halifax, Dartmouth

The Halifax Regional Municipality plans to start removing meters in downtown Halifax and Dartmouth in the first few months of 2020 and replace them with pay machines as part of a plan to overhaul how on-street parking is provided in the city.

Pay machines to start replacing parking meters in 2020

Parking meters, like these two outside Halifax Regional Police station, will eventually be replaced by a parking machine. (Robert Short/CBC)

Halifax regional council approved a recommendation at its Tuesday council meeting to increase on-street parking rates once new technology is installed.

The proposal was adopted without debate.

The municipality plans to start removing meters in downtown Halifax and Dartmouth in the first few months of 2020 and replace them with pay machines.

Once all the new equipment is in place, parking in Downtown Halifax will cost $2 dollars an hour for the first two hours and $6 dollars an hour for the next two hours.

The pay machines will not allow a vehicle to park for more than four hours in the same zone.

The rates in downtown Dartmouth will be $1.50 an hour for the first two hours and $4 an hour for the third and fourth hours.

Municipal staff expect the new rates will increase parking revenue by just over a million dollars annually.

About the Author

Pam Berman

Reporter

Pam Berman is CBC Nova Scotia's municipal affairs reporter. She's been a journalist for almost 35 years and has covered Halifax regional council since 1997. That includes four municipal elections, 19 budgets and countless meetings. Story ideas can be sent to pam.berman@cbc.ca

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