Nova Scotia

NSCAD instructors could be back in classroom as early as Tuesday

After 11 hours of meetings on Sunday it was decided the two sides in the contract dispute at the Halifax university would have their impasse settled through mediation.

NSCAD faculty and university going to mediation

NSCAD instructors went on strike March 1. (Paul Palmeter/CBC)

The 95 instructors and librarians at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design on strike since the beginning of the month will not be back on the picket line Monday and could be back to work Tuesday.

After 11 hours of meetings on Sunday it was decided the two sides in the contract dispute at the Halifax university would have their impasse settled through mediation.

Key issues in previous negotiations included a call for a wage increase, a reduction in workload and more job security for part-time faculty.

The union has been without a contract since last June.

These NSCAD students held a sit-in Friday at the university president's office. (Paul Palmeter/CBC)

On Friday, 17 students from the master of fine arts program at NSCAD held a peaceful protest when they occupied the office of president Dianne Taylor-Gearing.

The students said the strike, which began March 1, was putting the defence of their thesis exhibitions in the final six weeks of the school year in jeopardy.

Faculty union leaders from other provinces came to Halifax to support the NSCAD union at a rally Friday at Granville Square, below the president's office window.

Faculty union president Mathew Reichertz told CBC News instructors could be back to work as early as Tuesday. The union will be holding an information meeting Monday.

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