Nova Scotia

SPCA asks for help after 72 cats, kittens rescued from hoarding situations

The Nova Scotia SPCA is asking for donations to help cover veterinary bills and additional expenses for 72 cats and kittens that recently came into care, many suffering from respiratory issues and other illnesses.

SPCA estimates cost for veterinary care could exceed $58K

There were 72 cats and kittens rescued and transported to the Nova Scotia SPCA for urgent medical care this week. Many need expensive surgeries in order to recover. (Nova Scotia SPCA)

The Nova Scotia SPCA is asking for donations to help cover veterinary bills and additional expenses for 72 cats and kittens that recently came into care, many suffering from respiratory issues and other serious illnesses.

Many of the cats and kittens were rescued from two hoarding cases in Pictou County and Cape Breton, and require urgent medical attention. 

The SPCA estimates the cost for veterinary care could exceed $58,000.

"The animals were in conditions that we wouldn't consider acceptable. There were animals that were in, what we would deem, as in distress," Sandra Flemming, provincial director of care at the Nova Scotia SPCA, told CBC Nova Scotia News at 6.

"They were very sick, showing obvious signs of disease, some had eye issues that would require surgeries, very severe upper respiratory [issues]. Very unhealthy overall."

 

Flemming said hoarding situations are often complex and in some cases, the owner calls the SPCA directly if they become overwhelmed. Sometimes owners are reported to the SPCA by concerned citizens.

Flemming said 24 of the sick and injured cats are being treated at the Dartmouth SPCA, but shelters across the province are overwhelmed as the COVID-19 pandemic has stretched them to the limit.

"Any time the organization takes in 70 plus cats, it's obviously a stress on our resources," she said.

The SPCA says all of the cats and kittens have been seen by a vet and some have already undergone surgery. (Nova Scotia SPCA)

On top of that, many of these cats have to be isolated so as not to spread diseases to other animals waiting to be adopted.

"Sometimes it means we have to transport them around, moving other animals to other shelters, so we can free up space so that we can have isolated rooms that are just for these animals," Flemming said.

"So it is a bit tricky for us, but we have staff that are amazing and that respond to these situations and we make it work."

Eye surgery, dental work needed for many cats

Flemming said all of these cats and kittens have been seen by a vet, some have already undergone surgery and some are still in need of further nursing care. She said more than 75 per cent of these animals need dental work.

"But they're all responding really well now that they're on medications and they're in a clean environment where they're getting the care that they need."

Flemming is asking the public for donations in order to help as many of these cats as possible. The SPCA has a no-kill policy, meaning animals are not euthanized to create space for incoming animals.

"Their care is going to be extensive," she said.  "And it's requiring specific staff to work with them and to provide that nursing care to get them over the hump and get them up for adoption."

With files from CBC Nova Scotia News at 6

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