Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Power says it now generates 30% of its power from renewables

Nova Scotia Power says 30 per cent of the electricity it produced last year came from renewable sources such as wind power.

More than half of utility's electrical generation still comes from burning coal, petroleum coke

Nova Scotia Power says 30 per cent of the electricity it produced in 2018 came from renewable sources such as wind power. (The Canadian Press)

Nova Scotia Power says it has hit a new milestone in its delivery of electricity from renewable resources.

The private utility said 30 per cent of the electricity it produced in 2018 came from renewable sources such as wind power.

It said 18 per cent came from wind turbines, nine per cent from hydroelectric and tidal turbines and three per cent by burning biomass.

However, more than half of the province's electrical generation still comes from the burning of coal or petroleum coke. Another 13 per cent comes from burning natural gas and five per cent from imports.

The utility said since 2007, the province's reliance on coal-fired plants has dropped from 76 per cent of electricity generated to 52 per cent last year.

Nova Scotia Power said it expects to meet the province's legislated renewable target of 40 per cent in 2020, when it begins accessing hydroelectricity from the Muskrat Falls project in Labrador.

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