Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia Power asks for business support before possible strike

As Nova Scotia Power heads into conciliation talks with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers next week, it seems to be preparing for any eventuality, asking its "key" business partners to support it in the event of a labour disruption.

Power workers union IBEW has been without a contract with Nova Scotia Power since end of March

Nova Scotia Power is heading into conciliation talks with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers next week. (CBC)

As Nova Scotia Power heads into conciliation talks with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers next week, it seems to be preparing for any eventuality, asking its "key" business partners to support it in the event of a labour disruption.

In an email sent Wednesday morning, the utility's supply chair manager-procurement John MacDonald makes Nova Scotia Power's position clear.

"Our expectations of you, the suppliers/contractors, is that you will support us in any way possible which could include crossing a picket line," he said. 

IBEW represents almost 900 full and part-time Nova Scotia Power workers, including power line technicians, meter readers, power engineers and generation staff.

IBEW 1928 spokesman Jeff Richardson told CBC he was unaware of the email, but would reserve comment until after conciliation talks, planned for Monday and Tuesday of next week.

The union has been without a contract since the end of March. 

Earlier this spring, union members rejected a final contract offer from NSP and applied for the conciliator.

In his email, MacDonald said NSP understands this could be difficult for some, "but as a 'key' business partner, we require everyone's support no matter how difficult the situation."

He asked recipients to reply to the email "to confirm their support and commitment."

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